How to Use Twitter: Some Quick Tools
What I’ve learned about  how to use Twitter
  • Thank people for favorites and re-tweets–sometimes you can reciprocate with things you like from their pages
  • Don’t push your book every single minute. (Everyone out there is trying to do the same thing.)
  • Put up pertinent material–for instance I tweeted when Truner showcased my novel at BEA, and I put a link up to an excerpt of my book, or the new cover for my book.
  • Theme pictures should be interesting.  I took the cover of my book off as my theme picture and put up a picture of a statue of Buddha.  I  may change it again, but I won’t be putting up the cover of my new novel. I’ve got so many interesting pictures taken in Asia!
  • Make sure to use a photo of yourself
  • Follow people you’re interested in and follow back for the same reason
  • Check in with followers and who you’re following every couple of weeks–things change and you’ve got to keep up with the times.
  • Use some hashtags, not many.  I use them for  #writers and re-tweet groups when your’re tweeting about your publishing, or giving readings, or presentations, etc.
  • Don’t overuse direct messaging.
  • If you have time ,you can chat people up and try to make connections and “hook ups”–for instance I met a terrific writer in England and asked him to guest blog on my personal website, and I wrote a guest blog for his site. This was quite thrilling!
  • Blogging is important. Your own blog site and others (In fact my website is being revamped, but when it’s ready, I will ask some authors to write guest blogs for me.) Link to your blogs and other people’s when they have pertinent material.
  • Write interesting little tweets: quotes, links to articles, things about other writers you’d like to plug.  I use  #WW : worth watching on Wednesdays and #FF : Follow Fridays on Fridays, and then add the handles of people that I’d like to support.
  • Support other writers, even if they don’t write in your genre or mine, historical.  Support poets!
  • Follow friends, writers, professionals in other fields,  and groups. I  introduce yourself when I find something in common: various states or countries they live in and I’ve visited,  people who speak Spanish and Italian, wine-makers, etc.
  • There are tons of tools to use, but I don’t have the time, or energy to devote more than I do, which is a little every day, just to keep my fingers in the pies.